What is the Functional Movement Screen?

Understanding how and why we move helps us to improve. The FMS uses objective and validated standards to check the movement baseline and build foundations for lifelong movement success. Its streamlined system has benefits for everyone involved – individuals, exercise professionals, and physicians.


The FMS utilizes simple language, making it easy for individuals, exercise professionals, and physicians to communicate clearly about progress and treatment.


The screen identifies asymmetries and limitations, including areas that the individual may be at risk of injury.


The FMS creates a baseline to mark progress and provides a means to measure performance.


The FMS quickly identifies dangerous movement patterns so that they can be addressed. It also indicates an individual’s readiness to perform exercise so that realistic goals can be set and achieved.


The FMS can be applied at any fitness level, simplifying corrective strategies of a wide array of movement issues.

The base line score will show any asymmetries or dysfunctional movement patterns that we can work to correct. You will be provided a report with our suggestions for improving your score. This assessment tool allows us to monitor progress and screen for potential imbalances that may be developing from training, and we can then work together to correct them.

This system is used by many Professional Sports organizations like European Soccer and the NFL in monitoring athletes throughout the season and as a tool to prevent injury.

If you would like more information regarding individual and team testing, contact the front desk at (905) 339-2333, or info@dynamichealthandperformance.ca.

The Painful Truth About Fibromyalgia

The Painful Truth About Fibromyalgia

By Amanda Liddle, HB.Sc(Kin), R.Kin, CAT(C), RMT

Pain is highly personal.

One person’s “I hurt all over” is not the same for another person’s “I hurt all over.”  Especially when you suffer from Fibromyalgia — a chronic disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and tenderness in localized areas.

A syndrome that affects the muscles and soft tissue, Fibromyalgia symptoms can include chronic muscle pain, fatigue, sleep problems, andpainful tender points.  Researchers believe that Fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way our brain processes pain signals.  Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress and in other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event.

While scientist don’t know what causes this condition, women are more likely to develop Fibromyalgia compared to men.  On February 2, 2018, Lady Gaga announced the cancellation of the final 10 dates of the European Leg of her Joanne World Tour due to severe pain that has impacted her ability to perform.

While there is no cure for Fibromyalgia, exercise, relaxation and massage therapy can help control symptoms and improve quality of life.  Massage therapy from a Registered Massage Therapist can provide the following benefits:

  • gate control theory: touch sensory information helps inhibit pain fibre activity which reduces the perception of pain
  • increase the production of the body’s natural pain killers
  • reduce tension in muscles
  • increase range of motion
  • reduce heart rate
  • restore homeostasis of the body therefore decreasing anxiety/depression
  • encourage circulation therefore removal of waste products and allowing for an influx of nutrients

For more information on our massage therapy services, please contact me at (905) 339-2333 or email me at aliddle@dynamichealthandperformance.ca

Text Neck & Posture

Text Neck: Why Kids are at High Risk

How to Avoid Neck Pain and Improve Their Posture

Using a personal device shouldn’t be a pain in the neck.  However, children who spend more than 30 minutes on their devices in one sitting could suffer from chronic neck and back pain later in life.

Our clinic has seen a significant increase in postural injuries in children over the past 10 years and research suggests that hunching over electronic devices at a young age can entrench bad habits which will cause musculoskeletal issues in adulthood.

When the body can’t maintain the optimal position for its muscles to move and generate force, they figure out how to compensate or cheat to get the job done.  This compensation results in wear and tear on the body.

Here are some tips to help parents manage screen time and help reduce text neck!

  1. Chin up!

The most important way to avoid various neck problems is to not look down at a personal device for a long period of time. Bring it up to eye-level — if your child always keeps the tablet on their lap, try propping it on a table.

  1. Take a break

Children who spend more than 30 minutes on their devices will begin to show signs of neck and back pain.  Insist they take a break, flex their neck and get some physical exercise!

  1. Plank It

Challenge your child to take the plank or ½ plank position to help stimulate the glute bridge muscles and stabilizers.  In this position, your body has to do some work rather than slumping and hanging.

  1. Don’t let hips sag down to the ground, maintain flat back and butt by flexing abdominals
  2. Keep shoulders down, and neck long
  3. If your child is too tired to hold a good position, they are not strong enough to continue.

1/2 Plank

Full Plank

The Problems with Chronic Cardio

Chronic Cardio

When people think of working out or losing weight they often think of jogging, running, the treadmill, swimming, or biking. And they aren’t wrong. These are great activities. However, many people believe that cardio is the key to losing weight, and research is saying otherwise.

According to Mark Sisson, constantly pushing yourself to run, cycle, or swim further and further everyday can cause your heart to be overworked. Over time this can put your heart at risk of enlargement and wall thickening, putting you at risk of a heart attack.  (See Mark’s article for more information on how constant cardio can also create cardiac arrhythmias and atherosclerosis.)

Another issue with chronic cardio includes overtraining. Problems can arise when we don’t let our body recover in between cardio training, which can create chronic oxidative stress. Oxidative stress occurs when we breathe, and is caused by free radicals. Free radicals damage cells in the body, and overtime can leave our cells and tissue unable to to function properly. Even though you may see your run times decrease, your body is not getting the recovery it needs.

As we age our muscle mass naturally starts to decrease which can create issues and cause injuries during chronic cardio. Now we aren’t saying that you shouldn’t do cardio, we are big fans of cardio! But there is a happy medium. To gain optimal function and training we recommend a combination of interval cardio and strength training.

If you have any questions or are interested in learning more about training, don’t hesitate to contact Dr. Jeff Weekes at drweekes@dynamichealthandperformance.ca.


It’s that time of year! With a new year upon us comes new year resolutions. Did you know that only 8% of people who make a New Years resolution stick to it? Often this can be because the goal is too vague, too broad, or there are simply too many goals to keep up with. The key to making a goal is making it SMART! (No not you being smart… even though you all are 😉 ).

SMART Goals stand for the following:

S = SPECIFIC: Make your goals specific and focus on one goal at a time.
For example: My goal is to get in shape. But what is in shape for you? A better way to reframe it would be, I am going to lose 10 pounds.

M = MEASURABLE: How will you know when you have achieved your goal? Your goal must be quantifiable and give you the ability to track your progress.
For example: I am going to go to the gym more. What is more? How will you know when you are going ‘more’? A better way to reframe it would be, I am going to go to the gym 3 times a week for the next month.

A = ACHIEVABLE: Is your goal realistic? Is it something that you can actually achieve?
For example: I am going to lose 30 pounds. Maybe you are recovering from a sickness and losing 30 pounds isn’t achievable for you right now. Let’s start smaller, and reframe the goal as: I am going to lose 5 pounds this month.

R = RELEVANT: Is the goal worthwhile? Is it consistent with other goals you would like to achieve?
For example: If my other goal is to run 5 km by June 1st, then losing 5 pounds could be relevant. However, if your other goal is to get a job you have been eyeing up, then losing 5 pounds isn’t really relevant.

T = TIMELY: When do you want to accomplish it by? When you have a set date it creates a higher likelihood that you will work towards it.
For example: I am going to lose 5 pounds. By when? Reframe it as, I am going to lose 5 pounds before March 1, 2018.

Try out this template to lay out your New Years resolutions!

Credit for template: http://templatelab.com/smart-goals/

Back to Basics with Hip Hinges

Walking into the DHP rehab area, you’ll notice patients lined against the wall holding a wooden dowel to brace themselves; one end in hand and the other end placed just a foot or two in front of their own feet on the ground. You’ll most likely see patients pushing their hips back

and touching their glutes to the wall. This, my friends, is a popular exercise in the DHP facility we like to call hip hinging.

Many of the patients we see (children, adults, athletes), perform much of their forward bending using their lower backs, placing much stress on the lumbar spine.  As a toddler we rarely see this lower back bend because we primarily used our hips to bend over, so the question is – what has happened between then and now to make this fundamental movement pattern change?

This compensation or misuse typically occurs in individuals who have dealt with injuries and thus, use this method to avoid pain or limited range of motion. In addition, those who’ve simply adapted to poor posture for prolonged periods of time bend the lower back because it’s simply the easiest way for them to move.

Using the hip hinging method that is often seen in clinic,

we teach patients to utilize core muscles to support the spine, torso and pelvis. The hip hinging exercise teaches the body to re-learn a basic functional movement pattern; the body re-learns to use the hips to initiate the forward bend all while bracing the core. Ultimately, this will prevent the slumped or curved forward posture that often looks as though the individual is tucking their ‘tail’ between their legs.

As an essential movement to everyday life, we need to understand that the hip hinging mechanism can help when picking up your child,

grabbing the newspaper off the front driveway, and even at the gym when athletes perform their daily workouts that involve lunging or squatting. In addition, athletes understand that the ultimate base position for sport involves bent hips and

knees in addition to an engaged core, benefiting athletes to effectively generate more controlled power.

All in all, as a functional movement the hip hinge is the ultimate foundation for major lifting techniques, such as the squat and deadlift – and most of us perform these movements in some way during our busy day-to-day lives.

So it only makes sense that we all pick up that dowel, find a spot on the wall and re-teach ourselves to hip hinge effectively.